The Quick & Easy Guide to Putting Your Podcast on Auto-Pilot!

by Chris C. Ducker · 88 comments

Screen Shot 2014-04-21 at 6.18.51 PMPodcasting is big business.

I’ve been podcasting for almost 4-years now and I can directly relate additional business, more profits, more connections, better community building and a host of other opportunities to that sheer fact that I’m actively engaging in this brilliant medium.

Just like a blog, I believe that every entrepreneur today should be podcasting. Truly, I do.

One of the main reasons a lot of people don’t pull the trigger on this, however, is because of the time it takes to produce regular podcast content. Today, I want to try and change that!

The following is the EXACT process I follow to put my podcasting on auto-pilot.

It’s so simple, anyone can follow it.

Step #1 – Creating Your Podcast Content

This is the one part of the process that you cannot hand off to anyone else. This is why people are going to tune in. They are going to tune in because of you.

podcast set-up

People want to hear your stories. Your experiences. They want / need your expertise. They want you. So, give it to ‘em, okay!

And a quick note on equipment – you don’t need a pro set-up like the one I use, above. Just a simple mic and a quiet environment is all you need to get started.

Step #2 – Editing Your Podcast

Once I’ve created the raw content of my podcast, I dump the files into a Dropbox folder which is shared with my Podcast Editor VA. Typically there are two files:

  1. The bulk of the show – either an interview recording, or my solo presentation for that episode.
  2. My spoken intro – this is where I mention any special events, masterminds I might be doing, etc., it’s also where I read out recent reviews for the show, too.

My editor will then get to work splicing these files together with my pre-recorded intro and outro, and export everything as the final .mp3 file.

Step #3 – Tagging & Uploading Your Podcast File

As soon as my editor has finished the editing of the show he will upload the file into another Dropbox folder I share with my General VA (GVA).

podcast tagging

She will then tag the .mp3 file with the show’s artwork, and the episode information (image above), before uploading it to my audio server – I currently use Libsyn for the New Business Podcast and Soundcloud for the Virtual Freedom Podcast.

She’ll then forward on the URL of the uploaded file to my Show Note Editor VA.

Step #4 – Create Your Podcast’s Show Notes

Once my show note editor gets the URL, she’ll download the file and listen to it. At the same time she’ll be taking down notes on important parts of the show, as well as any mentionables, such as websites, videos, etc.

She’ll then use the file’s URL to embed the audio file into the show post (I use the BluBurry Powerpress plugin), select an image to go along with the podcast topic (image of the guest, for example), write intro and outro paragraphs, select a few main talking points from the session and list them down, embed any videos, list down all the websites, etc., and finally hit ‘Save Draft’.

She will then drop me an email letting me know that the post is ready for my approval.

Step #5 – Publishing Your Podcast

I’ll then log into WordPress, open the draft post and check it out. Once I’ve spent 10-minutes going over it, making any final tweaks, etc., I’ll either schedule it to go live at some point in the future (I currently have podcast content scheduled until June!), or simply hit publish.

Step #6 – Promoting Your Podcast

At this point my General VA will put together a quick ‘social image’ (pictured below), and post the image, along wit a quick description to Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Google+ to spread the word.

NBP-Episode21

She will then log into my Aweber account and with a pre-written email that I’ve already given her, schedule a broadcast to go out to my subscriber list to alert them of the new content, too.

That’s it.

That’s my entire process for producing (and promoting) podcast material on a regular basis.

About The Team That Gets it Done!

I want to state very clearly that only one person in this entire process is employed with a full-time salary – my General VA – as she does plenty more for me, too

orange-push-pin-mdEvery Entrepreneur Should Have a General VA!
[Click Here for a 'Quick Start' List of Tasks to Outsource to the GVA]

My podcast editor (based in the Philippines) and my show note editor (US-based) are paid on a per episode basis. Meaning, if I take a break for a bit, it doesn’t cost me anything.

Everyone involved has a copy of this process flow and follows it time and time again. It’s not broken, so nobody tries to fix it.

It simply works.

I hope you’ve found this quick guide helpful, and I’d like to do more of these simple process posts for you, if you’d like to see them, of course?

Question: If there was ONE process you’d like to offload to virtual staff with the help of a simple post like this one, what would it be?

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{ 88 comments… read them below or add one }

ilias diamantis April 21, 2014 at 20:46

Hey Chris !

What’s up ?

Why you use Soundcloud over Libsyn ?

Cheers .

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 21:08

Hi Buddy

I wanted to try Soundcloud out because of their brilliant social media integration, and I’ve loved it, too!

C

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Jamie April 22, 2014 at 21:46

Hi Chris,

Great posts, Chris thanks for sharing your process.

I’m about to get started on the podcasting journey, so off the back Illias question, I am wondering which you’d recommend libsyn or sound cloud?

Thanks Jamie

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:54

Hi Jamie

Either audio set-up’s are good. Soundcloud for me is still an early adventure. So, it’s tough to say, I’m afraid. I’ve loved Libsyn for 4-years and have had ZERO issues, Soundcloud is great from a social sharing standpoint – so….. flip a coin…?!!

C

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Bryan Crawford April 21, 2014 at 20:54

Chris, with your crazy schedule how do you handle seeking out and scheduling guests? I am sure now with your brand power it is much easier to have a list on standby. But in the beginning, how does someone who is already running a business add this to their portfolio?

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 21:00

Hey Bryan

Yeah, it’s a little easier for me to get guests now – normally a handshake at an event, or a quick email or tweet does it. But, in the beginning I would just hustle, like I always have (and will) on something new I’m working on.

It’s all about the hustle, man.

C

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Tema Frank April 23, 2014 at 00:03

The easiest way to get guests is to find out who has just published (or is about to publish) a book on your topic. Most are so eager to promote their books that they are easy to get for your podcast.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:47

Yep – great tip right there!

Everyone loves talking about their books!!!

C

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Jared Easley April 30, 2014 at 11:00

Hi Bryan,

Have you tried looking at new books in Amazon for your niche? The author of those books want to promote their new book. They are likely to be willing to do a podcast or blog interview. I have other ideas that are likely to be helpful if you ever want to chat.

Jared

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 14:14

Thanks for interjecting, Jared. This is something I do, personally, when I is it bookstores.

I simply take a snapshot of the cover with my iPhone and then tweet the author… Hardly ever fails. :-)

C

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Life After FI April 22, 2014 at 00:02

Chris,

I have started following your blog very recently. Landed here through Pat Flynn’s blog.

One suggestion – The share tool bar that you have on the left hand side (through which users can share the post on Facebook, Tweeter etc) keeps moving when I scroll the post. I find this moving toolbar very irritating…….. it was not letting me focus on the content. You may want to keep it stationary instead of a moving tool bar.

Just my 2 cents!

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 20:55

Thanks for the comment. That share plugin is actually supposed to ‘stay with’ the viewer, so that they can share the post at any time.

It works, too!

But, I appreciate it not for everyone. Thanks again for commenting, bud.

C

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Al Pickett April 24, 2014 at 16:26

I love that it moves. A psychological reminder and ask to share your content.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:37

Thanks, Al – thats the whole point :-)

C

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Life After FI May 8, 2014 at 23:46

Yes agreed that it works as a reminder but it spoils the readers experience. It depends – What is a priority for you: Reader’s experience or sharing? Anyways, if the content is good, they will automatically share it (No need of this reminder)

I am trying to adjust to the bar but still find it very irritating. If I am unable to adjust, I will not be left with an option but to stop visiting the blog (And I am sure, there will be many readers who echo similar views)

My 2 cents!

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Chris C. Ducker May 9, 2014 at 14:05

Thanks for the input, it IS appreciated, bud.

I’ll look into other potential options.

C

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Jan Orsula April 22, 2014 at 00:02

Hello Chris, simple, but very effective steps. Thanks for sharing

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 20:53

Thanks for checking them out!

Glad you liked the post, Jan.

C

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Vukasin April 22, 2014 at 00:13

Hey Chris

Nice guide, maybe it will help me in the future if I ever decide to start a podcast. First thing is that I need to perfect my English language starting from the grammar and moving to the accent (which is at this moment horrible).

But glad to hear that you are rocking with your podcast for 4 years already.

Cream rises to the top!

Keep rocking Chris

Vukasin

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 20:52

Thanks, Vukasin.

As for accent – I don’t people are as concerned about that all that much nowadays – we’re more interested in VALUE. More importantly the value that someone that we’re listening to is bringing us, our life, business, etc.

Give it a shot, buddy!

C

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Nick Loper April 22, 2014 at 05:49

I’ll vouch for the power of podcasting as well. I’m only about 1 year into my podcasting “adventure” and will say it’s introduced me to entire audience of people who probably never otherwise would have heard of me and my work. And at the same time, it’s a perfect excuse to chat with awesome people from all around the world and help spread their story (including one Chris Ducker)!

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 20:50

That’s the reason I originally started my podcast – to chat with other likeminded (and most of the time much smarter!) entrepreneurs.

It seems to have worked out really well. :-)

C

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Dave Starr April 24, 2014 at 10:26

You just hit on something there which so few ever mention when talking about podcasting … and interviewing industry people in particular.

Sure there are a dozen common reasons why adding a podcast (or making a podcast alone into a business (EntrepreuurOnFie perhaps).

But you stated something there which makes it very important even to “little (tiny even) guys” like me.

It’s the best possible ways to interface directly, even with huge names in the Blogosphere. Like taking a college course where there was a guest lecture every week from all the “giants” in your field of study.

Learn for yourself and don’t worry about your own readers/listeners at the beginning .. they’ll be happy to come along for the ride.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:38

That’s it. Right on, Dave!

C

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Jason April 22, 2014 at 21:09

I don’t mean to be a critic but I came here because I was looking for a process. What I learned was you hand it over to a Virtual Assistant and they do the work. This article should be called “How a VA helps you Produce a Podcast”. I thought there was a groundbreaking piece of software here, but no it’s just taking half the work and handing it over to someone else to do and that’s not ground breaking, although it is efficient and smart.

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 21:13

Hi Jason

Everything I do with my virtual team, every task they take care of for me is a process. Groundbreaking software would be great, I agree – but, until then good old-fashioned workflows keep the entrepreneur sane enough to continue to deliver value…

Thanks for the comment.

C

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Nick April 22, 2014 at 21:12

This is awesome and timely. Just pulling together my Confessions of a Terrible Husband podcast and one with my 4 year old son. We’ve recorded three episodes and have intro/outro jingles ready. I need to record my intro and then get it over to my podcast editing VA to work his magic. Only piece left before submitting and going live is artwork for that.

Thanks Chris!

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 21:37

Hey Nick!

First up – LOVE the name of your podcast. Brilliant stuff. :-)

Congrats on getting to where you are already, with such structure – it’s key, I’ve found to the consistency.

Keep rockin’ and let me know how you get on!

C

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Phillip Swindall April 22, 2014 at 21:12

Chris
Out of curiosity, what is the general range of cost for each of your VAs mentioned in this post?

Right now, I’m not looking for a full time GVA, but the hourly cost of the GVA and the per job cost of the Editor and Show Note Editor?

If a new podcaster was working TOWARD hiring VAs to support the podcast, it would help do know how much money they would need to produce through the podcast to at least break even with the Virtual Assistants.

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 21:36

Great question, Phillip. Happy to share, as always…

My podcast editor and my show notes editor cost me around $120 per episode. My GVA is paid $650 a month – however, she’s been with me for a fe years. Starting salary for a decent GVA is approximately $500 per month.

Hope that helps.

C

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Phillip April 23, 2014 at 06:07

WOW! $120 per episode! For a week day daily (which was what I WAS doing until I took a third shift job to “extend the runway” a bit) show, that’s $600/week for editors and $125 a week for a GVA!

So, just to break even, I’d have to bring in close to $3000 on the podcasts, or about $150 per episode!

Guess I better get busy working to build an audience so I can let go of some of this work! LOL

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:45

Everything is relevant, Phillip – if you’re making the money you need to warrant additional costs, then enough said.

Audience is where it’s ALL at, thats for sure.

C

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Mikael Rieck April 23, 2014 at 18:28

Amazing stuff and definitely something I will use even more (just hired a guy to do the editing for me at $17 per podcast). I will definitely have to look into outsourcing even more of the tasks to someone else. Could probably use my full time VA to do some of the tasks.

Thanks for the wakeup call.

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Chris C. Ducker April 23, 2014 at 19:59

Good stuff, Mikael. Let me know how you get on!!

C

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Roger Edwards April 22, 2014 at 21:15

Great article.

I’ve been experimenting with a Fitness Podcast (www.grandnat.co.uk/GFOC) as a test bed for a niche business podcast I’m working on for the UK Financial Services market.

I have a VA teed up to help so this is a useful summary of the process.

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Chris C. Ducker April 22, 2014 at 21:34

Brilliant, Roger!

Excited that this came just at the right time for you. Good luck with the show, mate.

C

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Joe Pollock April 22, 2014 at 21:39

Chris,

Thanks for sharing your podcast workflow and showing that it’s not as daunting as it seems.

How long did it take for you and your editor to get an efficient system / workflow down?

Joe

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:55

Hi Joe

Not long. I put this together in around 3 episodes worth of work, tweaking, changing bits, etc., it’s worked like this for a long time, and it’ll continue to serve me and my team well for a while, thats for sure!

Thanks for the cool question.

C

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Deborah Henson-Conant April 22, 2014 at 21:51

Thanks for this great, simple breakdown! I love the image of your podcast studio. I also want to be interviewing guests in live situations. Do you ever do that and do you have a mobile studio setup as well – or a suggestion where to see a great description of one? Thanks again.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:53

Hi Deborah – thanks for appreciating the content.

I’d love to interview more of my guests in live situations. I done a few of them and they’ve always been awesome. I’ll be putting together a post on mobile new media set-up’s soon! Stay tuned.

C

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Joe Saul-Sehy April 22, 2014 at 22:02

Love the work flow. How come you didn’t write this two years ago when we started the Stacking Benjamins podcast? :-) The piece I’m currently not handing off to a VA (and the piece that never seems to get done) is the cool graphic advertising your show. Brilliant (to hand it off) and easy to finish….as long as it’s not me trying to juggle that along with everything else.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:51

Thanks, Joe.

Get going with those images, they help a LOT in helping your stuff get shared via social.

Good luck!

C

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Trevor LaRene April 22, 2014 at 22:03

Chris,
Excellent information! I’ve listened to you on talk to Pat Flynn and Meron Bareket on their podcasts. In fact, Meron also helped me launch my own (“Make Your Someday Today”.) I’m at the point where I can still handle the day to day duties with my podcast, day job and family life, but I can see that I will need the ability to outsource some of the jobs to a VA in the not-too-distant future. It’s good to know how you manage your podcast (because so many of us aspire to your level!) Thanks for the help!
Trevor

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:51

More than happy to help, Trevor.

Stay tuned. More to come.

C

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Taylor April 22, 2014 at 22:16

Chris,

This is great. I need this system so badly. I do all my own editing and it’s tedious.

So how do you find a podcast VA? Elance?

Also, why do you prefer Lipsyn over Blbrry’s native hosting?

Godspeed,
Taylor

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:50

Elance is a great place to start, Taylor. Any of the job posting sites will give you a good start!

Libsyn – it’s just the way I got started. I followed the great advice of Cliff Ravenscraft – he’s still my podcasting yoda! :-)

Good luck with your podcasting, man…

C

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Clark Buckner April 22, 2014 at 22:27

Podcasting has opened so many doors for me and helped me connect with some of the most interesting folks. I agree – it’s definitely a game changer and it is something to pay attention to.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:49

Yep – bang-on, Clark.

Thanks for dropping by.

C

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Scott Tetley April 22, 2014 at 22:29

Chris, you are the bomb – love your work. You’ve created fantastic processes so that your value is sustainable – nothing short term here – onwards and upwards.

Thanks for the pricing/salary info – it was a question of mine too :)

Looking forward to meeting you at Problogger Conference in August.

Cheers

Scott

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:49

Thanks, Scott. Appreciate you words of kudos.

Can’t wait to shake your head in the Gold Coast, mate. Until then… stay tuned.

C

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Scott Tetley April 22, 2014 at 22:30

Forgot to ask, if you had your time again – would you do the main podcast with soundcloud? Will you change it at some stage – thanks heaps.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:48

Not sure. Good question. I like both platforms, so it would be a tough call…

C

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Gabriel Atkinson April 23, 2014 at 00:45

Chris,

Thanks for this article. The work flow process was very enlightening. I just started a podcast of my own (The Health Theory) and it can be time consuming if you handle all the elements yourself. I’ve also been reading your book Virtual Freedom, and I know eventually I’ll want to hire virtual assistants but do not have the funds to do so at the moment. So at the moment my wife and I do the work together since it is our podcast. I would love an article from you talking about monetizing a podcast. Just a idea for future content. Thanks for all you do to help people like myself achieve their goals.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:47

Thanks, Gabriel. Glad you enjoyed the post.

Appreciate your kind words, bud.

C

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Mireille April 23, 2014 at 04:51

Hey Chris,

I am looking for a podcast VA. Can I find one from Virtual Staff Finder? If not, where would you recommend?

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:46

No, VSF focuses on GVAs only, Mireille.

Try one of the job posting sites – there is plenty of talent out there, from all around the world.

C

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Ioannis Anastassakis April 23, 2014 at 05:32

Excellent process-oriented post , Chris
PLEASE do keep these kinds of posts coming – they are extremely useful!

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:46

Okie Dokie, Ioannis – will do :-)

Keep tuning in.

C

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Robb Gorringe April 23, 2014 at 06:09

Chris,

This post is absolutely ‘Golden’! Some may not realize it, but this post alone is worth the cost of an entire conference. That’s what we love about you, and why we’ll continue to support what you do.

“….Where’s the tissue? I’m having one of those moments.”

R

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:44

Thanks, Robb. Appreciate your kind words, man.

Keep those ‘moments’ coming… I secretly love ‘em!

C

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Val April 23, 2014 at 09:17

Hi Chris,

First, great post – should have been a podcast! :)

Personally, I have never recommended Libsyn (Although most Podcasters would), the level Customer Service/Support was never there at the level that I require for my productions. In my opinion, SoundCloud is easier to use and their app has a much better aesthetic interface that integrates well on my client sites.

I will give further thought to outsourcing again (Attempted in the past, but just could not systematize in way that I had hoped). Perhaps your next post should be about, “How to Successfully Systematize Your Business with Good VAs”.

Love all of your great content!

Cheers.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:43

You never know, Val – maybe I WILL do a podcast on the same topic – my podcasting audience is different to my blogging one, etc.

Appreciate your kind words, and you caring for my content. Thank you.

C

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Louise Bibby April 23, 2014 at 13:16

Thanks for this very useful content Chris. I’m getting ready to start a podcast and have 2 VAs working full-time for me (courtesy of VSF!), so this workflow process has given me a great breakdown of how to outsource a lot of the work. The simple tip that you can hire certain VAs to do per-episode work is one that hadn’t occurred to me (sometimes the simplest things are what you don’t see!). That would make my podcasting plans even simpler to implement, and I’m up for anything that’ll get my podcast up faster, while saving me time and energy.

Really appreciate your generosity in sharing these processes. I’d be VERY keen to read more of these process-focussed blogs. I’m sure we could all learn heaps from your systems – tried and tested over many years! :-)

Cheers

Louise

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:43

Thanks, Louise. I appreciate the great feedback.

I intend to do more in the future, for sure. Glad it resonated with you so much.

C

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Peter Carter April 23, 2014 at 15:30

Hey Chris,

Awesome post – you really simplify everything and coming from a music production background, I have a nice Mic ready to go. Just got into Blogging myself – Did you start off doing regular website Blogging and then develop into podcasts? At what point did you make the transition and start incorporating Podcasts in your schedule too?

Cheers,
Peter

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:42

Hi Peter

Yes, I was blogging for around 6-months before I started podcasting.

I’ve been podcasting VERY regularly since the middle of 2012. Good luck with YOUR podcasting journey!

C

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Kevin Anselmo April 24, 2014 at 07:10

As a relatively new podcaster, I enjoyed reading this post. Thanks for sharing your process, Chris.

I’ve done nine podcasts for my new show focused on best practice marketing / communications tactics within higher education. For the first five shows I did everything on my own – start to finish. It was taking me an incredible amount of time. I decided to outsource the production and I couldn’t be happier with this decision.

It is wise advice for all writers – regardless of how gifted they are at writing – to have a second set eyes review the piece for publication. I feel the same way about podcasting. Outsourcing production – in addition to saving time and energy – serves as an invaluable editorial review process.

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Chris C. Ducker April 25, 2014 at 00:38

Excellent points, Kevin. Thanks for the great insights.

C

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Babalola Jide April 25, 2014 at 03:31

What programmes do you use in recording and editing? Can I record straight into audacity for instance? Let’s say I don’t have the money to pay a GVA how do you suggest I bootstrap the process of producing a podcast?

Lagos, Nigeria

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 04:49

Call Recorder for recording and then my editor uses Garageband for editing.

You’ll simply have to learn how to edit yourself. It’s easy on Garageband. Just watch from tutorials on YouTube to learn!

Thanks, Babalola.

C

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Mikka April 25, 2014 at 06:42

Hi Chris, great one. Thanks for sharing. I have just decided to go back to blogging. This will be something to work on soon. All the best.

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 04:48

Awesome, Mikka. Glad the timing was good.

C

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Rob Lawrence April 25, 2014 at 06:51

Chris, podcasting is big business!

I would say that 40% of my work now involves editing audio for others, most of which is podcast, or for podcast, material. That percentage is positively growing.

Emphasizing your point about not needing pro audio gear to get started: In this context, “Content is king!”

Your first podcast is likely better quality than most phone calls and most listeners are used to that level of quality so no reason not to get started. By far the best way to start sharing certain content – and to then get better at the craft.

There are few, if any, audio related problems that any experienced podcast production VA would not be able to fix; therefore beginners can relax about the audio. (A good performance is usually a relaxed one – enjoy the chat!)

As you suggest, content creators are often best placed focusing their time and efforts on what they do best: creating awesome content, building relationships and conducting insightful interviews.

One other recommendation: be great at scheduling!

Would be very interested to learn more about how you schedule your podcast processes up to release, Chris. Perhaps that is another opportunity for a podcast too?

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 04:47

Great questions and insights, Rob.

I’ll certainly think about putting together an episode, specifically on this subject with a little more info.

Appreciate you.

C

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Robert Harper April 25, 2014 at 12:59

Chris,

Great content as always. Would you be able to share with us the posts you used to acquire your editing and show notes VA’s?

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 04:47

They were actually recommendations from other people… But, just checking out sites like eLance and oDesk will help you get a solid idea on things.

C

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Luis Morales April 28, 2014 at 06:29

Hey Chris,

I’m about to release my new podcast and want to know:

1. what do you use to record the interview?
2. How do i edit it without a VA?

Luis

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Rob Lawrence April 28, 2014 at 23:24

If Chris doesn’t mind me chiming in here…

Luis, there any many options with which you can you record and edit material (without a VA). Adobe Audition and Audacity (free) are popular amongst podcasters.

Call Recorder by ecamm, Soundflower and Pamela also allow you to record your interviews using Skype.

That might get you started?

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 04:44

Thanks for the input, Rob.

C

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Chris C. Ducker April 30, 2014 at 04:45

Hi Luis

I record using eCamm’s ‘Call Recorder’ software, which is Mac centric. Although Pamela on Skype does the same thing. You can then edit using Garaeband (Mac), or Camtasia software (PC).

Hope that helps, bud.

C

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Stephen May 6, 2014 at 22:44

Hey Chris,

Thanks for this guide to setting up and managing a podcast without spending all of your time doing it. As we’re looking to get into podcasting (because we’ve seen the results others like yourself have been able to experience), this step-by-step set up guide will be helpful!

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Chris C. Ducker May 8, 2014 at 17:16

Awesome, Stephen. Glad it could help.

Thanks for dropping by and appreciating the post.

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Ian May 16, 2014 at 22:54

Hi Chris,

Thanks to your encouragement I’m already using several VAs for my main e-commerce site to do data entry, a site redesign and social media strategy.

After listening to this episode and a couple of nights ago staying up until 2am finishing up our travel journal podcast I realized that it was time to find a VA to take over most of that work so I could sleep and actually be functional the next day.

I have an interview with someone on Monday who seems like she will be a perfect fit.

Thanks for the encouragement.

Love the book,
Ian
http://catholictraveljournal.com

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Chris C. Ducker May 19, 2014 at 18:25

Awesome, Ian!

Thanks for the update and I’m stoked to see that you’re doing so well with your VAs. Congrats!

Keep rockin’, and if you’ve got time, I’d love to see an Amazon.com review from you fro the book! :-)

C

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AJ & Serenity Services May 30, 2014 at 02:43

Hey Chris!

I really enjoyed reading this blog post. My partner and I are always looking for other ways to promote our online business and gain more clients. Using a virtual staff to take care of the podcast promotion for you sounds like a brilliant idea!

If we could outsource one of our processes, it would probably be improving our social media marketing.

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Chris C. Ducker June 2, 2014 at 15:12

Social is the one (along with email!) that comes up over and over again.

Just put on autopilot what you can, but don’t forget the integration needs to come from you, directly :-)

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Des July 31, 2014 at 06:23

Hi

This is really interesting. It sounds like you need a very detailed spec to provide to your va. To make sure they get all the little details right at each stage. Could you share your spec that you send to them?

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Chris C. Ducker July 31, 2014 at 11:27

Erm… I just did, Des. Literally.

It’s not rocket science, just be clear about what you want and manage the process a few times to make sure the outcome is the desired one you’re looking for… then – autopilot time!

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